Productivity

Life Sciences Industry Cloud

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As we begin the New Year we’ve gone through our resolutions. Now the focus for us is to gain a fast start 2015 loadingand the aim of this first blog post around the idea of the Life Sciences Industry Cloud. I’ll provide the background and challenges you will face, and what you could consider that will put IT in a position to help meet your business goals.

Background: The Enterprise in 2015 

Cloud computing has been often discussed as the innovation option for Life Sciences companies. Back on September 7th, 2014 I wrote about an initial way of getting into cloud via Testing in Planning your Move to the Cloud? as an option to get the organization used to using cloud applications.

I read an interesting article from Alison Wagonfeld (@awagonfeld) The Enterprise in 2015. Which takes an investor’s perspective on technology trends for the Enterprise, and the focus on “industry cloud” applications. The article points our examples from Salesforce and Veeva of applications that can be rapidly deployed and consumed by business users. This puts Enterprise software vendors in a place to play catch-up with two distinct reactions/approaches. One is to buy up point solutions, and leave the integrations to the systems integrators (SIs) or the end-user. Cloud applications are easy to deploy the key here is to make sure you plan out the business process. The second being a hybrid approach where part of the solution is deployed as ‘on-demand’ (in the cloud) and integrated with the rest of the back office application (on-premise). This forces the end-user to rely on their SI to have the right resources and plan for every interface and data point.

Software challenges 

There is a nice summary on the software challenges we will face as we seek to improve the business with technology. Lora Cercere’s (@lcecere) article “Undeniable Truths of Software” provides some very good perspectives on the challenges that Enterprise Software vendors face. She describes a variety of challenges with software companies.

Because the cloud vendors come at the problem from the user side it is easier to create a solution with no back-end integration. The challenge for the Enterprise Software vendors is do they re-write the application or develop only a portion of the business process. There are some Life Sciences clients that are waiting to see how the enterprise software vendors respond to the challenge from cloud applications. There are other considerations from a business user perspective that is driving these discussions*.

Electric plug

[*I will look at the issues with Big Data and Mobility in another blog post.]

Best practices that allows you to leverage cloud applications

Prior to cloud applications the focus was on ‘best practices’ for each industry. I contend that we have to resurrect these processes as a guide to reaching the Life Sciences Industry Cloud.

Working industry cloud

The focus should be on the business process and the integration points needed to offer the complete process for the end-user. This allows for an easier time to ‘validate’ the process. In 2015 we are at a point where business users are clamoring for IT to improve the business. The benefits are as follows:

  • Enterprise software vendors can pick which part of the business process to move into the cloud or stay on-premise. Timing for all this is inevitable as the users of the solutions prioritize business process that give the highest benefits and can rank them so.
  • System Integrators (SIs) will have to live with the fact that deploying cloud applications are more about the experienced resources used in faster and quicker projects than long program deployments. Done well repeat business will help drive net new opportunities.
  • Clients need to become more aware of the users and how they work to give the right business process. Change should be the motive in all this – failure to recognize this will lead IT to fall out of favor with the business.

For many customers the move into cloud applications can be daunting given the investment in on-premise software applications. Today’s users want to work more efficiently and have already personal experience with cloud applications. The goal for 2015 is how well you can adopt the Life Sciences Industry Cloud into your organizations.

Let me know what you think?

Thanks,

Jim

Staying organized with Trello

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In this blog post, I wanted to focus on productivity tools to help make our digital lives easier. Most of us have multiple devices: laptop, smartphone and possibly a tablet. We work across multiple projects: supporting our clients, collaborating with co-workers. We also have to manage our home and work life. Here is where Trello comes into play. https://trello.com

Advertised as “the fastest, easiest way to organize anything…” Highly recommended and here is why:

1. Managing multiple projects: The old way is not a match for the mobile user.

I’ve found that most written to do lists are static and hard to track. Let’s face it most of us are visual, and we are juggling lots of projects and activities. I’ve moved from carrying a small notebook to this foam board, and very similar to a Kanban board for you supply chain folks. Looks great – easy to step back and see the big picture.

Foam Board
Foam Board

The downside to this is the ability to generate checklists per each entry. Adding attachments is difficult. Most importantly it’s at home and I’m on the road, and it is hard for my colleagues to keep up with any changes.

2. Maintain multiple projects anywhere, anytime.

Trello works on my Smartphone,

iPhone 5s
iPhone 5s
Inside Trello on my iPhone
Inside Trello on my iPhone

tablet, and

Trello on my tablet
Trello on my tablet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Same screen as on my smartphone
Same screen as on my smartphone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

laptop. (I use a PC for work and an Apple Mac Book Air for personal use).

Trello start screen on the MacBook Air
Trello start screen on the MacBook Air

 

Notice the similarities
Notice the similarities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Trello is easy to support.

Using their “Welcome Board” you can easily learn a use this product, and have your work projects and personal activities organized quickly. You can manage board colors, labels, and move through a progression of activities starting with a To Do list – Doing list – and a Done list. Want to make your own set of lists – Trello is easily modified.

My next steps are to test this next week when I’m traveling, and in meetings. I will be collaborating with my colleagues on key activities. I make extensive use of the checklists and attachments to help progress these projects.

If you do use this let me know how this works out for you?

Thanks,

Jim