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This year’s focus

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January was an interesting month. Too many work projects that took time away from writing. Last month, WordPress provided a nice summary of last year’s topics. A look back at 2012 revealed that you were most interested in the healthcare value chain and supply chain.

2013

Looking ahead for this year I would like to focus on the following:

  1. Healthcare improvements
  2. Analytics and Mobility
    Analytics and Mobility
  3. Big data
    Big data
  4. Supply chain management (SCM)
  5. Customer relationship management (CRM)
  6. Business transformations for Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices
    Business Transformation
  7. Book reviews on relevant topics

Besides these topics I continue to see my activity on Twitter as a ‘service’ to those who are interested in the Life Sciences and Healthcare industry. Key hashtags include:

  • #pharma, #medicaldevices, and #lifesciences – how technology, social media, and regulations impact this industry segments.
  • #mHealth and #mobility – the use of mobile devices will impact healthcare.
  • #hcsm and #sm– how to best leverage healthcare social media.
  • #healthit, #it and #CIO – all topics related to IT.
  • #sales and #productivity – is a new focus for me since being active in sales

I hope to continue to blog and ‘tweet’ on topics that give help to others. I thank those of you that offered feedback on my blog posts.

Thanks,

Jim

2012 in review

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Hi all,

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for my blog. Thanks to everyone that visited my blog post I appreciate the visits and the chance to share some of my thoughts around technology and Life Sciences. I will publish a plan in early January for the 2013 calendar year. Scroll down for the key metric and access to this summary report.

Have a wonderful holidays and Happy New Year…..  Jim Sabogal

Here’s an excerpt:

The new Boeing 787 Dreamliner can carry about 250 passengers. Jim’s blog was viewed about 1,600 times in 2012. If it were a Dreamliner, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

What is your Strategy for Mobility?

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The driver for this new blog post came as a result of my recent trip to the SAP Sapphire conference in Orlando. I have an interest in technology and focus on the #mHealth (mobile health) aspects of Healthcare. It was during several discussions with key executives that you realize that few companies are prepared to handle the shift in the industry around ‘mobility’ more specifically the use of smart phones. Many IT organizations drive a strict policy around the use of smartphones. When I joined my company there was no strict policy. It is left up to the user to decide what his or her needs are and make their choice.

I previously wrote about a solution back on June 15th, 2010 entitled: Aligning Life Sciences and Healthcare IT. Part 2 A Practical Mobility Solution for Doctors and Nurses. We delivered a system that met the needs of a client for one specific problem using one form of technology. Last year this was a great example of the use of smartphones to improve the productivity and communications between nursed and doctors in providing ‘improved’ healthcare. When I reflect back on this if the client decided to change smartphone technology what would this do to the current process in place? One statistic that highlights the acceleration of smartphones is that by 2013 that there will be 6 billion devices!

In many organizations IT can be a deterrent in today’s rapidly changing world of mobility. There are a few things IT cannot change or control:

  • You have a ‘fixed’ budget
  • No control over changes in ‘compliance’
  • No way to expect your user’s increasing expectations

Evolving Technology versus your Fixed Budget

Users are looking to manage their time by finding ways to be more productive. As the pace of smartphones increases I believe there needs to a strategy that is ‘agnostic’ to the end device (whether you use an iPhone or an Android device). I recently ‘tweeted’ the following message: “David Mosher talks about how tablets are changing #medicine http://bit.ly/jsgDF0 RT @ONHealthcare: #mobility #healthit “ New apps are being released that can greatly improve various facets of healthcare. I am convinced technology is accelerating faster than IT policies.

Another example of how technology is changing the way IT provides support to their users. Google recently announced their “Chromebook.” In short these are laptops with no applications installed on the end-user device. Everything is running off of cloud services. So how can I lower my costs and allow for security, and at the same time give the users flexibility of using technology their most comfortable with….

  • There are several companies looking to offer their own “apps” store. This allows users to easily download company specific and widely used applications.
  • Deploy a mobility strategy… at the Sapphire conference I’ve seen solutions that allow IT to give access to key business processes

The SAP mobility strategy may be one choice that allows IT the ability to ‘connect’ key processes and make them on any device. This also includes the relevant data that can be used to make key business decisions. As more and more workers look to collaborate the mechanism to manage all this is ‘how fast can IT push this data out’ and into the hands of their workers to make key decisions.

IT groups must now see how they can balance the enterprise with mobility to create the ‘mobile enterprise.’ Over the next few months there is a concerted effort to prove this in the market. By providing a roadmap and tool kit to help organizations set up this mobile enterprise. Some of these components are here today and others are still being developed, and to reach this potential your mobile strategy should have the following attributes:

  • Device independent
  • Deliver and Enterprise – ready security solution
  • Provide integration to ERP/CRM

This strategy will eventually evolve to include Business Intelligence as well as governance, risk and compliance later in the year. What I will be focusing on is the ability to help Life Sciences companies fulfill this ‘mobile strategy’ through a series of investments and proof-of-concepts. As this proceeds I will offer a future blog post to cover this story.

I’ll conclude this blog post with a reference to an interesting article found in Computerworld May 23rd, 2011, Opinion: Halamka: Facing down VUCA, and doing the right thing.

The author, John Halamka, describes how IT leaders deal with ‘unpredictable demands; ever-changing technologies; and all on a fixed budget.’ These leaders must embrace VUCA and ultimately move from the left to the right. With the world exploding with data and businesses looking to compete in the new world the article pretty much sums up how to prepare yourself to meet this challenge and turn it into an opportunity for your business.

Volatility                      ->                                        Vision

Uncertainty                       ->                              Understanding

Complexity                ->                                       Clarity

Ambiguity                ->                                     Agility

Thanks,

Jim

Fresh start in 2011

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By now everyone has gotten past their New Year’s resolutions and is picking up where they left off last year. So thinking about my

Fast start...

 first blog post for 2011 I would like to cover the following areas:

  • A look back at 2010
  • Maintaining momentum in 2011
  • The focus for the year

Reviewing 2010

The nice thing about blogging is that you can go back and see how you’ve progressed throughout the year. In last year’s blog post: Upgrading for 2010 I had worked on a business plan to startup a new Life Sciences practice for an IT services company. I covered the five focus areas last year by writing about the following topics:

  • Social Media – from the use of these tools to deriving ‘value’
  • Cloud Computing – producing a white paper for my employer
  • Drug Development
  • A three-part series on Aligning Life Sciences and IT – covering how to leverage information technology; Mobility and Innovation and the Business Process
  • Innovation and Outsourcing
  • A book review on ‘selling’
  • Patent Expiry

Unfortunately the business plan was not approved, and I moved to another opportunity to do business development for an IT services company. This challenging role now has me advising clients on the best use of IT within Life Sciences and Healthcare. This opportunity came by way of my network, and for that I can thank Robert.

Maintaining Momentum in 2011

I continue to focus on the use of social media tools. So I am thankful for my LinkedIn network and my followers on Twitter. I have come across lots of folks with the same interests and challenges for the Life Sciences and Healthcare industry. There are tons of creative people with new ideas for solving today’s business problems. In 2011 I want to carry the momentum started in 2010.

Karl Rove and Jim, 14Dec2010

 

I am also very grateful for my co-workers, coaches and mentors who have helped me transition into my new business development role. Towards the end of 2010 I started to see success in driving new opportunities for my company by aligning IT to improve businesses. Along the way I’ve met many interesting people. I had the chance to attend an industry meeting for Medical Devices and speak to Karl Rove the former aide to President Bush. Politics and Healthcare are very intertwined and for 2011 there continues to be changes.

 

The Focus for this year

I plan to enter 2011 by expanding on last year’s topics. How do I combine my interests with the tasks of being a business development executive? Here’s what I’ve come up with:

  1. Leveraging Twitter to cover the following areas:
    #pharma – how is clinical development, social media, and regulations impacting this segment of Life Sciences?
    #mHealth and #mobility – the use of mobile devices will impact healthcare throughout the world.
    #hcsm – how to best leverage healthcare social media?
    #healthit and #it – what is the impact of IT on the organization?
    #personalizedmedicine and #genomics – will genomics have an impact on healthcare in our lifetime? (I’m currently waiting on results of my own genomics that has to do with ancestry.)
  2. Business process improvements in the areas of Product Lifecycle Management (PLM); Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and Supply Chain Management (SCM).
  3. Clinical Development and Analytics
  4. Cloud computing
  5. Mobility
  6. Mergers & Acquisitions
  7. Globalization

In case I forget to add Marketing and the use of Social Media to further drive IT services opportunities. I will be more involved in our website and the use of the social media tools.

I continue to have a personal interest in the Life Sciences and Healthcare industry. Last year I saw the impact of ‘personal health records’ for my brother who is a kidney transplant survivor. I’ve have friends succumb to diabetes, and parents who are aging. How will technology help to improve the lives of these people? Will this be something I will see in my lifetime?

 

January Snowstorm for Newtown, Pennsylvania, USA

So like the snow storms on the East coast of the US. As of January 2011 there are more storms this year than last year. We are starting 2011 with a lot of momentum.

Thanks,

Jim

Happy Holidays….

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To my followers on Twitter and LinkedIn,

I want to wish you and your families a happy holidays, and have a great New Years’s. Thank you for all your support and collaboration. Looking forward to a great 2011!

 Warm regards,

Jim

Deriving “value” in today’s world of Social Media

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The focus on this article is to help you find “value” through the use of social media tools. The idea came to me when I read the Community Pharm post entitled Hindsight Is 20-20 But Foresight Is Critical. In this article, the main idea was on the Pharmaceutical brand manager’s focus on budgeting. I want to discuss ways in which this budget can be applied to activities that ultimately add ‘value,’ and how you can find ways to apply social media tools to drive revenue your products.

In setting the context for this discussion: I have the task of starting up a new business unit. So along with the usual business plan and strategic sessions that go into creating a new practice we need to find ways to promote our product and services. Most of us will also go through a process of creating a marketing plan. What I want our Marketing group to carry out is to:

  • drive revenue and specifically top-line revenue
  • create a positive image for our products and ultimately our company
  • help us understand the market and our customers

We’ve elected to merge the use of social media tools into our plan, and began a search for how to do use these tools. One article that I found helpful was 12 Reasons to Use Social Media to Grow Your Business by Pam Dyer.

She provides both growth information as well as twelve compelling reasons to use social media to grow your business. I would also recommend bookmarking these sites:

So now you know the how to use social media. Now let’s get back to the brand manager and his budget. The obvious question is what business models to invest in when your focus is on Healthcare? A good friend of mine Andy De (http://www.andyde.com/) has an article entitled: Will Social Media find “Meaningful Usage” in a Healthcare Context.

He proposes a ‘strategy framework’ around six business model scenarios for social media and healthcare. Of the six models our company has embarked on the business model scenario E. You see we offer IT services and solutions for Life Sciences and Healthcare. We have a keen focus on the “mHealth” market (also called “telehealth”). What is your focus/business model?

Our next steps are to start with tools such as Twitter, and Blogging, along with LinkedIn to create awareness around a set of products and services within Life Sciences and Healthcare. Your plan will be different. Our goals are set-up to allow our company to get accustomed to the use of social media tools. So far taking small steps has helped us evolve our company as we break into new markets. We have allocated budget for this activity and the value will increase over time. Do you have a story to tell about the use of social media for you company? Community Pharm (http://cp.pharmalive.com/) is a site for sharing such ideas. Let us know if this article was of value and if you want us to present relevant topics.

Thanks,
Jim

In search for more when you know less

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I’ve worked for 2 global organizations in my career and you come to accept your source for data to come from within the company. Changes in the economy and the information age have forced us to learn new ways to ‘farm’ new data sources. The last few weeks I have been engaged in a launch of a new IT services and solutions practice which reminded me of just how important it is to keep learning – and search for more when you know less.

“I still read the newspaper”

There I admit it – yes I still read the newspaper every morning (the Wall Street Journal). I saved the article on “The Search for Serendipity” by L. Gordon Crovitz (Monday, April 5, 2010). He makes the case that while the information age “have given us access to endless information from diverse sources, many of us focus on narrow topics.” He positions the role that a newspaper has in delivering relevant news and how editors present these varied topics. The reader needs to pick and choose their topics. Something that is missing in today’s endless streams of data. I am interested in a narrow set of topics for what I do, and it seems I also want to select how to put random topics together. It is that search for serendipity that I want on a daily basis.

“What I like and dislike about Social Media”

In my current role we are evaluating the use of Social Media to promote our IT services and solutions. In a recent webcast on Social Media “Online Marketing Innovation” http://bit.ly/b7oxIl – the presenter was Seth Godin, a well known marketer; we have about five years to learn how best to uses these tools. He pointed out that the next generation of consumers and decision makers has all grown up on Facebook. That the shift in advertising has changed. In the past it was the job of Marketing to get out the message via advertising. Consumers now have the power and products now need a following – a reason to want these new services and solutions.

In the area of IT services for Life Sciences and Healthcare nearly all of our competitors have common services. So the focus is on the creation of distinct ‘solutions.’ I am glad to say we have developed two new solutions, and that’s where Twitter and Blogs can help. I am personally not too sure about Facebook, at this time (still learning – will see). I hope to leverage these tools to create a subset of ‘followers’ who believe our solutions have purpose and are unique to this industry. I hope to write about this in future postings. I do see value in the use of Twitter and Blogs.

The need to learn

Coming up with ‘differentiation’ for any product or service for any industry (in my opinion) requires a focus on ‘innovation.’ The world continues to evolve at a rapid pace. I am not too sure what it will be like in five years. I have too much to do to think about that, so my focus is on ‘continuous learning.’ I came across a wonderful posting from Todd LaRoche entitled “What did you learn in school today?” (October 23, 2009) I would recommend reading this posting. Coming up with new ideas is not easy. We all need to learn something new each day. Hope this helps…..

Thanks, Jim